IOS

ios-apps

I use these apps on an almost daily basis, and I’m sure my iOS experience wouldn’t be the same without them. What are your favorite iOS apps? Social Facebook This one is an obvious one to have. Even though it’s always crashing, it’s a lot better than going to their mobile version. And it has push notifications. Tweetbot The official Twitter app doesn’t look as awesome and doesn’t support CloudApp; and since it has push notifications support now, I love it even more. AIM I’m always on AIM, and even though there are alternatives to the official app, I’ve never quite got used to the other ones. Fitness Fast Food Calories I like knowing how many calories I’m about to eat, and with FastFood, I have access to the menu of several restaurants along with their food’s calorie counting. Weighbot Nothing motivates me to lose more weight than knowing how close I am to my goal. Weightbot allows me to track my weight every day so I know how far I’ve come and how much more I have to go. Dayta When I’m not tracking my weight, I’m probably tracking my runs and other misc. fitness related data. Dayta allows me to track everything with ease and provides awesome analytics and graphs to see how far I’ve come. It’s even got a web app now that syncs your data for you. Work Wallet I have tons of stuff to remember on a daily basis; Wallet allows me to be able to forget some of those things. It’s also available on the Mac and syncs with MobileMe. Things I’ve been using this as my task manager for a long time. Even though they don’t have cloud syncing *yet*, I’ve gotten so used to it that using anything else is just a hassle. Quicklytics Integrates with my Google Analytics account and gives me detailed reports on the go. Universal with iPad support. Skype Video chats, calls and regular chats. Awesome to stay connected with oversea employees. Going Out Tipulator Gorgeous way of calculating tips. WhereTo? Find new places nearby to go eat, etc. Be Put…

Read More

Although Google Chrome is *essentially* nothing more than a UIWebView skin on iOS, it’s still a much better browsing experience overall. The one thing that really kills Chrome is the fact that all apps will launch in Safari by default. But there’s a way to prevent this. It takes co-operation from all of the major developers, but if implemented, could be really, really cool. Here’s a quick run down on how it works: When the user clicks the “Open In Web Browser” option, here’s the code that needs to be implemented in order to default to Chrome, but fallback to Safari if Chrome is not installed. 1 2 3 4 5 if([[UIApplication sharedApplication] canOpenURL:[NSURL URLWithString:@”googlechrome:”]]) {     [[UIApplication sharedApplication] openURL:[NSURL URLWithString:[NSString stringWithFormat:@”googlechrome://%@”, myURL]]]; } else {     [[UIApplication sharedApplication] openURL:[NSURL URLWithString:myURL]]; } Why is this a good idea? If a user has Chrome installed, chances are they wish that it would be their default browser. And this method works. Very well, actually. Again, just an afternoon’s thought. But it would be awesome to see it come together. Agree? Disagree? I’d love to know why. Email or tweet me. Update: A lot of people have emailed/tweeted me saying that it’s unfair for me to say that Chrome is “just a UIWebView skin”. I definitely didn’t mean to downplay the hard work that went into making Chrome for iOS. The speed difference doesn’t bother me, and it’s my default browser on all my iOS devices. I simply meant that due to Apple’s restrictions, Chrome uses the UIWebView without all of the awesome things that make Chrome, Chrome.

Read More

Creating an iOS web app is extremely simple, yet extremely underrated. Advantages to web apps include being able to instantly “push” updates of your app, not having to go through the Apple approval process, and multi device compatibility. Making your web app feel like a native app is not so hard, and with the following HTML tags, your app should be looking good in no time. Please note that all of the following tags go in between your HTML’s <head></head> tags. Setting the application’s icon The application icon is what the user will see when they add your web app to the home screen. <link rel=”apple-touch-icon” href=”app_icon.png”/> If you don’t want the gloss, use this instead <link rel=”apple-touch-icon-precomposed” href=”app_icon.png”/>   Setting the application’s loading image If you’ve used an iPhone app before, you know that before being able to use the application, a “splash” image shows up until the app is done loading. Setting this in your web app is super easy as well, here’s the tag you use – <link rel=”apple-touch-startup-image” href=”loading_image.png” />   Make the application “Full Screen” If you want to hide the Safari navigation controls so that your application appears “Full Screen”, the following line will do the trick. <meta name=”apple-mobile-web-app-capable” content=”yes” />   Changing status bar types iOS has several different types of status bars. Black, translucent and the default white gradient bar. If you don’t want the default white bar, here are the different META tags that can be used to switch them up Default <meta name=”apple-mobile-web-app-status-bar-style” content=”default” /> Black <meta name=”apple-mobile-web-app-status-bar-style” content=”black”  /> Black Translucent <meta name=”apple-mobile-web-app-status-bar-style” content=”black-translucent”  />   Allowing your user to scale your app If you don’t want your user to be able to pinch to zoom in / out of your app, the following tag will help you out. <meta name=”viewport” content = “width = device-width, user-scalable = no”   />

Read More

In order to setup your APN server to work with the Apple Push Notifications server, you’ll need to convert your Push Service certificates to .pem files. Some might not know how to properly go about doing this, so here we go! First thing you’ll want to do is open up Keychain Access On the left hand side you’ll see the “Certificates” section, click on it You should see your Apple Push Services certificates on the right hand side   Right click it, and click the Export option given to you. Name the this “apns-dev-cert” Now, click on the side arrow next to the name of your certificate and you should see a little key icon Right click the key icon, and export the key as “apns-dev-key” Now, open up Terminal and go to the directory you exported the certificates to. Type in the following commands (in order), providing your password when prompted. openssl pkcs12 -clcerts -nokeys -out apns-dev-cert.pem -in apns-dev-cert. p12 openssl pkcs12 -nocerts -out apns-dev-key.pem -in apns-dev-key.p12 openssl rsa -in apns-dev-key.pem -out apns-dev-key-noenc.pem cat apns-dev-cert.pem apns-dev-key-noenc.pem > apns-dev.pem Go ahead and close Terminal, you’re all done.

Read More